Second life

According to the National Association of Homebuilders, “If all the dimensional lumber used to build the 1.2 million new homes constructed in the United States each year were laid end to end, it would extend 2 million miles, the equivalent of going to the moon and back six and a half times”(Barley, 2014).  People are suggesting there is too many garbage being created instantly from many factors. Usually from the daily waste, manufactory, industry and most importantly constructive industry. Architectural wastes are not valued as the main pollution, this is forgivable because people are paid for built house and unlikely to aware how were the constructive waste being disposed of.  This problem has got worse as the day goes along, we are highly recommended to pay more attention to this problem. Remarkably, more people aware this issue and start taking action.

Architects or builders used to leave over so many materials. However, they could be the solution to worriment. What they do is to recycle or reuse the unwanted waste. Everyone is the magician, the artist, the inventor who is able to work so well in creative thinking. Recycling materials and reuse them to offer a new appearance is not a difficult job. It’s the way how you do it. Either the new product may just simply done on basic ideas and skills which are not special at all or it can be done in an innovative way that can be other’s inspire.

There is no right or wrong in the design world. Personally, I am more admire to the clever and unprecedented design. Here I found a very symbolic example of what I’m trying to express in this passage.

Hotel hotel?March Studio: in Canberra Australia

01_Hotel+Hotel_+March+Studio_photo+by+John+Golings

“March Studio has been awarded the World Interior of the Year prize for its design of a sculptural timber lobby and utilitarian bar at a Canberra hotel.”(Frearson, 2015)  They absolutely deserve this award. Timbers are the main recycle materials used in this hotel. “The brief here was to use recycled materials,” says March Studio director Eggleston.(Quartz, 2016) It seems to be the design topic for their hotel: Recycle. He also said: “There was all this timber that had been used to make the whole building and we thought this was a great opportunity to do something with all those offcuts.”(Frearson, 2015)  This shows that the designer doesn’t think straightforwardly of recycling, instead, he was trying to find other alternative ways to do this task which as a result it came out a very good recycling design.

Over 5,000 wooden offcuts were fixed on the walls and ceiling. The lengths are supported by steel rods that run from floor to ceiling while more reclaimed timber was used to create a grand staircase. Avoiding the design turn into too ordinary, marbles are used in details like the circular skylights, a large fireplace, and the screen; Concrete and black steel panels featured in the lobby area. I partially like the main stairs so much where the lengths of wood are designed to laminate together to form steps, this formed a great tension and the sense of leading you going up to the stairs.

Hotel-Hotel-ground-floor-interior-by-March-Studio_dezeen_02 Hotel-Hotel-ground-floor-interior-by-March-Studio_dezeen_08 Hotel-Hotel-ground-floor-interior-by-March-Studio_dezeen_07 Hotel-Hotel-ground-floor-interior-by-March-Studio_dezeen_03 Hotel-Hotel-ground-floor-interior-by-March-Studio_dezeen_10 Hotel-Hotel-ground-floor-interior-by-March-Studio_dezeen_09


Bibliography:

Barley, L. (2014) Using Recycled Materials For Architecture, Regular New. Available at: https://regularnew.com/2014/03/07/using-recycled-materials-for-architecture/ (Accessed: 15 May 2016).

Frearson, A. (2015) Hotel Hotel by March Studio wins World Interior of the Year, Dezeen. Available at: http://www.dezeen.com/2015/11/06/canberra-hotel-lobby-bar-march-studio-world-interior-of-the-year-2015-world-architecture-festival/ (Accessed: 15 May 2016).

Quartz, R. (2016) What to do with all that timber offcuts?, CHBC GROUP. Available at: http://www.chbcgroup.net/the-chbc-group-blog/what-to-do-with-all-that-timber-offcuts (Accessed: 15 May 2016).

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